we don't need to change how we do conservation, we need to change why we do it

Category: Humanity’s Future

Hiatus

Good morning fellow conservationists, climate activists and rewilders! Well, I think I’ve shot my last bolt for now from the extremophilechoice.com website. There’s nothing new I can feed into our shared new(s)-hungry cyberspace, so I invite you to look over any previous post that interests you, and to engage with me in its comment section …

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The Journey (to Find a Pathway to Global Climate and Conservation Responsibility) Part 7 of 8 – How do you Hug a Cladistic Tree?

. . . When the lateral roots of two Douglas-firs run into each other underground, they fuse. Through those self-grafting knots, the two trees join their vascular systems together and become one. Networked together underground by countless thousands of miles of living fungal threads, the trees feed and heal each other, keep their young and …

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The Journey (to Find a Pathway to Global Climate and Conservation Responsibility) Part 3 of 8 – Love Deepens

This is the third in what will be a series of weekly posts in which I’ll question the possibility, explore the difficulty, and argue for the mobilization potential, of understanding the systems of Nature on a personal level. Please use the links at the top of the page to read the earlier ‘parts’. Thus, when you practice just sitting …

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The Journey (to Find a Pathway to Global Climate and Conservation Responsibility) Part 2 of 8 – Love Grows

This is the second in what will be a series of weekly posts in which I’ll question the possibility, explore the difficulty, and argue for the mobilization potential, of understanding the systems of Nature on a personal level. Please use the links at the top of the page to read the earlier ‘parts’. Tues. June 12/07 ‘Cookie Time’ with …

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The Importance of a Body for Artificial Intelligence

Diana Kwon (Scientific American, March 2018, p 29): … recently, roboticist Angelo Cangelosi of the University of Plymouth in England and Linda B. Smith, a developmental psychologist at Indiana University Bloomington, have demonstrated how crucial the body is for procuring knowledge. “The shape of the [robot’s] body, and the kinds of things it can do, …

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